Malladi 2003.5, 3.7 GHz 1800. 2100. 2300. maybe even 700 can work just like LAA. Qualcomm, Verizon, and AT&T testing convincingly shows that commercial quality broadband can be delivered today over unlicensed spectrum. The telcos are targeting the Wi-Fi bands and possibly 3.5-4.2 GHz.

The same technology can be used to recover spectrum in licensed bands like 1800 & 2100, Especially in rural areas, massive amounts of licensed spectrum lie fallow. It would be enough, for example, to deliver a true gigabit of rural broadband.

LAA (Licensed Assisted Access) uses a control channel in licensed spectrum. AT&T is rolling it out later this year. That uses a sliver of licensed spectrum as a control channel and connects in other bands for capacity. Qualcomm has a similar system called MultiFire that works for new entrants because it doesn't require licensed spectrum.

Columbia Professor and FCC CTO Henning Schulzrine, believes "All new spectrum would be shared."  Circumstances and estimates vary, but sharing spectrum usually at least doubles capacity.

 

dave askJuly 2017 Gigabit LTE is real in 2017. So is 5G Massive MIMO. 5G mmWave to fixed antennas is likely 2018, with mobile to follow. China, Japan, Korea, and Verizon U.S. have planned $500B for "5G," with heavy investment expected 2019-2021. 

Being a reporter is a great job for a geek. I'm not an engineer but I've learned from some of the best, including the primary inventors of DSL, cable modems, MIMO, Massive MIMO, and now 5G mmWave. Since 1999, I've done my best to get closer to the truth about broadband.

Wireless One - W1 replaces 5gwnews.com in July 2017. Send questions and news to Dave Burstein, Editor.